Dead Man’s Fingers Roll’n Around Savannah

Dead Man’s Fingers Roll’n Around Savannah

I bought advertisement space on the back of a Pedicab for May-June-July to help generate interest in my book. Maybe it will increase books sales, or maybe not, but it sure is fun to see the ad zip by.

Below are excerpts from Dead Man’s Fingers where pedicaps are mentioned.

* * * * *

     A pedicab was a three-wheeled bike with a carriage seat on the back. A person, usually a healthy young college student, pedaled passengers to their destinations for a minimal charge. It was not uncommon to have two or more pedicabs engaged in a heated race across town with their excited passengers encouraging them to “Go faster!”

* * * * *

     Lisa had to make up for lost time and her feet could not get her to Wright Square fast enough. She decided to seize a pedicab, but the only one nearby was being used. She did not let that foil her plans. To get a pedicab from someone else required her to be anything except a nice young lady, but that was not a problem since Lisa was no longer being polite. She asked the driver on the seat if she could borrow his pedicab.

“Hell, no! I got people in the back,” he answered.
“I just need it for a moment. I will bring it back. The people can get out,” Lisa said.
A lady in a pretty green dress with a silk flower in her hair and two little girls, Thing 1 and Thing 2, were seated comfortably in the pedicab.
Lisa asked the lady to get out.
“No. The girls want to go for a ride around City Market,” Debbie Nyman told her.
“It is better to walk,” Lisa suggested.
“No. We want to ride. Get your own pedicab.”
“There are no more pedicabs available.”
“Sorry, this is ours.”
“I’m in a hurry.”
“Then run fast.”
Lisa didn’t have time to argue about it anymore. She dragged the lady out of the pedicab.
Debbie Nyman kicked, screamed, and held onto the bike, refusing to let go. She smacked Lisa on the shoulders and back.
It seemed hopeless until Lisa realized she needed a better strategy to acquire the pedicab. She gripped Thing 1 and Thing 2 and whisked them out of the pedicab.
The girls jumped up and down, crying while their mother continued to smack the pedicab thief.
Lisa pushed the driver off the pedicap seat and hopped on the bike. “I’m sorry! I’m sorry!” Lisa called behind her and pedaled as fast as she could to Wright Square. She rang the little bell on the handlebars for everyone to get the hell out of her way.
Lisa left behind an angry lady, two crying children, and an irate, foul-mouthed, yelling pedicab driver.

* * * * *

     The police cruiser screeched to a halt. Terrence and Rookie B. Cool got out just as a pedicab crashed into their back bumper.
Lisa was thrown off the pedicab and tumbled into the rose bushes. She stood up, stunned, dazed, and tangled up in thorns and pink rose petals. She had an 8 1/2 x 11 invitation to the art show at the Jepson stuck on her chest.